IQ Option Yahoo Answer - IQ Option United Kingdom

Short the literal FUCK out of IQ

Disclaimer and Risks: This is not financial advice, and you must always be cautious when betting against Winnie the Pooh. One major risk factor is the fact that BIDU owns 50% of IQ, and even more worrisome is that 30% of BIDU’s revenue stems from IQ. Whether or not China will intervene to prevent the plunge in value of its own version of Google is unknown, but is certainly a risk that should be hedged against. I’m very confident on this trade and have verified some of the more important arguments lined in the paper, but as always do your own DD and hedge appropriately.
Hello you beautiful bastards, it’s been a while. I’m back with another DD, but this time it’ll be a little different than my usual options-exclusive DD. As we all know, volatility was crazy during most of last week, making the Unusual Options Strategy extremely difficult to use due to the amount of noise that was in the options market. In addition, me and the gang are hard at work perfecting our analysis and filtration strategies, so it was a good week to diverge from my usual spiel on Unusual Options.
Now I’ve already seen a couple posts on iQIYI, or $IQ and its potentially fraudulent financial statements. However, me and my team did a deep dive into IQ and the Wolfpack Research report on the subject, and I wanted to offer my own voice in this discussion.
What is IQ?
About a month ago, Wolfpack Research released this report on its findings of evidence of IQ inflating its numbers. While Wolfpack doesn’t exactly have the best track record, the report was corroborated by Muddy Waters, who have a much cleaner track record for spotting these potential frauds.
IQ is known as the "Netflix of China", and is valued at around 12 billion dollars currently. It allows users to stream videos. The company is based in Beijing and is partly owned by Baidu, the "Google of China". It had its IPO in 2018 and is currently sitting at $17.95 per share.
Some of you have pointed out that it’s not the same situation as LK, as LK was cut and dry fraud and the IQ is simply inflating the numbers. I am here to tell you not only is IQ inflating the numbers, it’s actively taking steps to disguise its completely fabricated revenue, user count, and investments. Here is a detailed outline of what exactly the Wolfpack Report has found and see for yourselves if you think IQ should be valued at 12 billion right now.
How is IQ inflating its share prices?
There's more and more evidence piling up against IQ. Here is Wolfpack's full report. There are numerous red flags on IQ's financial statements, and the fact that the stock is still trading at such a premium is absolute insanity. Any single one of the factors above could mean a HUGE drop in share price, and yet we have almost a dozen of these factors congruent to each other. It’s safe to assume investigations of IQ are already well underway, and any negative news will send this stock drilling to the fucking core.
Options Activity
In terms of Options Activity, IQ had a fairly large put buy ahead of their earnings. However, that is not the real focus. If you were to look at the option chain on the LEAPS for IQ, you'll notice huge open interest in the January 2021 put contracts. This indicates that either funds are hedging against a downturn in IQ or are betting for a downturn in IQ's price similar to LK's earlier this year. Either situation plays very much into the bear thesis. There is also significant put option open interest on BIDU.
What the move?
What to play? IQ is a fraudulent company, so their earnings report on Monday is not necessarily going to reflect reality, and therefore the stock price will most likely not drill. However, the prices on the May 22 expiry options imply that you would only need a 1-2 dollar movement in price to be profitable with a strangle, regardless of IV, thus allowing you to profit from both sides in the short term.
In terms of the long term play, IQ will go down just like LK did, it's just a matter of when. LK tanked around 3 months after the Wolfpack report was released. This current report was released April 7th, and already numerous agencies and organizations are investigating IQ and its business partners, as well as several independent law firms.
My Personal Position and TL,DR
I’m personally going with the IQ Sept 18th 15p in order to balance out my cost basis and risk. They’re fairly cheap and will give me plenty of time to roll out to December puts if price action hasn’t moved by July. I’m hedging with 5/22 18C to play earnings and make sure I don’t get burnt if there happens to be a run-up and short term volatility.

UPDATE: Huge put buying and call selling right now, looks like institutions are catching on.
UPDATE: Earnings Call is 9:00 EST, we will wait until then.
EOD May 19: Huge blocks of IQ were sold AH, and new legislation is expected to pass subjecting Chinese companies to regulation by US based auditors and the PCAOB, potentially causing a mass exodus from Chinese equities. BEAR GANG
May 20 UPDATE: As will meade says, wow
submitted by qwertyrayz to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Purple Redux – Cash is King Part II – Carnage of the Robinhood Trader Clouding a Great Quarter

As I got a comment snarkily saying “good call” from u/should_have_RAN in response to my post on Purple on 6/29 (at the time PRPL was trading at $18 - current price now is $21-$22), I thought it would make sense to provide an update on the results.
The original post: https://www.reddit.com/investing/comments/hi3m1y/prpl_cash_is_king_significant_upside/
Note in the original thread I had estimated EBITDA to come in at around $35-$40MM to base my assumption on upside to a $35-$40 share price. Purple released earnings yesterday and reported an adjusted EBITDA of $35.2MM despite sales being lighter than what I thought and an implied adjusted, diluted EPS of about $0.57 / share. On the heels of that, Wall Street firms have upgraded their price targets: KeyBanc ($22->$26), Raymond James ($19->$28), B. Riley ($23->$26). You will note that from the prior post, this EBITDA level is supportive of a $2-$2.5B TEV assuming a $140-$150M annualized EBITDA figure and $2-2.50 of annualized EPS (mid teens TEV EBITDA multiple and a 15-20x PE ratio, in line or lower than peers despite the growth and margin story).
For those following the story, the shares are trading ~10% lower today following the news release. Well, gee, if everyone’s raising their estimates and people congratulated them on a great quarter in the call, why the hell is it trading lower? In my view, this is driven by a few things: 1) revenue came in lighter than estimates 2) people are not understanding the earnings story due to nuanced GAAP accounting and 3) they did not provide any guidance or perspective on 2H outlook, which is creating uncertainty. I will take each of these in pieces and follow up with some other observations from the release and the call that should further support the upside case.
1) Revenue was lower at $165M vs. the $175M consensus estimate. What happened here was that estimates increased on the heels of commentary PRPL released on orders data for DTC and wholesale. As I indicated in my earlier post, you can’t assume this is pure revenue as there is a revenue recognition delay between order and booked sale. Sure enough, this is what happened even though orders trends maintained momentum through the full quarter. There was a substantial runup in the share price over the last two weeks, including a crowd from WSB and Robinhood, who were banking on a blowout due to not understanding this difference. On the earnings CC, mgmt cited a backlog going into July that has now been filled, all the while, there still is a one week day lead time on DTC orders and wholesale orders are continuing to grow month over month with all 1800 partner stores now open. Net net, this means that the demand picture is still as good if not better than advertised and Q3 will have the benefit of 1) backlog from Q2, which could be upwards of $10-$20MM (Q2 implied orders were close to $230MM, less the $165MM of booked sales, less 10% reserve for warranties and cancellations, less wholesale orders which will always carry a backlog). I would also note that Q2 included the month of April, which was peak COVID. Monthly runrate revenues exiting Q2 were likely around $70-$80MM, implying a $200-$250MM quarterly runrate. Per mgmt on the earnings call, they are shipping every mattress they can make and are working fast to expand production in Georgia. Q3 could likely end up between $210-$270MM of revenue assuming they maintain the Q2 runrate and have shipped the backlog, which they said they did by the end of July. Note that the top end of this revenue range is likely difficult to execute with current capacity.
2) The company reported negative EPS of ($0.11) a share as a headline number. The problem with this figure is that it includes a couple of major non-cash expenses: the first is the warrant expense. PRPL has 14MM warrants with a strike price of $11.50. From an accounting perspective, when the value of the shares increase, the warrants then require you to increase the liability on the balance sheet as they have become more valuable and are viewed from an accounting perspective as a liability to the company (this is very similar to non-cash expense related to stock options – the warrants are dilutive, but that is already a fixed, known quantity). Secondly, the company had changes in its Tax Receivable Agreement which compensates the prior sellers for the tax basis they contribute to the company by converting their shares to from founder shares to common stock. Note that this has no economic impact to the business. These were the two major expenses contributing the gap between what was a GAAP $(0.11) EPS to a positive $0.57 EPS. Put differently, excluding the non cash charges that don’t matter, EPS is really $0.57 in one quarter, and in a quarter that included the impacts of COVID in April. Adjusted EBITDA was reported at $35.2MM which is the best proxy for apples to apples cash flow and how businesses are valued. This is why the company’s cash increased from $26MM to nearly $100MM in three months even though GAAP earnings were negative. Cash is King.
3) The company provided no guidance for the rest of 2020. Usually this is a sign of uncertainty and an unclear demand outlook – the market does not like this. When you sift through the conference call, you will appreciate that on the contrary, demand up through the date of the call has remained as robust and if not more so than what was the case in Q2. Note that we are 50% through Q3 already. Mgmt mentioned on the call accelerating and investing in its Georgia facility and ramping up SG&A expenses and hires. The logical question would be why do this if you think your demand will be weak or uncertain for the next 3-6 months. Mgmt mentioned on the call that there is still one week lead times on DTC orders (meaning there’s not enough inventory to ship next day), that competitors are struggling to source spring coils for mattresses due to shortages, and that DTC channel remains strong while wholesale is increasing relative to Q2. Take all these together and this provides support that Q3 will match the runrate of Q2 (the $200-$250M I mentioned before with June monthly sales around $70-$80MM based on the runrate orders adjusted for returns, etc). Separately, they mentioned that they have capped retail stores at 1,800 due to capacity constraints (meaning demand is more than they can meet at this time).
Assuming a $225-250MM revenue quarter, this means they will likely hit $40-$50MM of EBITDA in Q3 assuming gross margins of 45-50% (compared to 49% in Q2) and SG&A % in line with Q2. This would translate into EPS (excluding warrants and non-cash) approaching $0.65-0.85 / share, so nearly 1.20-1.40 in just two quarters. Let that sink in a bit. The performance still supports a much higher share price with TPX at a 23x PE ratio and 14x EBITDA multiple and lower growth. That’s how you get to a $35-$40 share price or greater.
Note that $250MM hits and exceeds the upper limit of their traditional capacity, though DTC has allowed them to drive a higher $/unit expanding how much they can sell per manufacturing line. There is a risk that capacity constraints keep the quarterly revenue to the lower end of this range.
A few other observations from the quarter that may have been missed: 1) the company has increased pricing during COVID with no demand drop off 2) wholesale is now growing in line or above PY despite retail traffic being lower 3) DTC demand holding firm and thus showing it is sustainable (the company is managing to capacity that is now growing by holding off on promotions) 4) gross margins and operating margins drastically increased due to fixed cost leverage (and some COVID cost containment) – “the story we’ve had on demand outpacing our ability to manufacture continues to be more true than ever” per the CC transcript
Resources for DD:
https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/TPX/key-statistics?p=TPX
https://investors.purple.com/press-releases/news-details/2020/Purple-Innovation-Provides-Business-Update-Ahead-of-Participation-in-Oppenheimer-20th-Annual-Consumer-Growth-Conference/default.aspx
https://investors.purple.com/press-releases/news-details/2020/Purple-Innovation-Reports-Record-Second-Quarter-2020-Results/default.aspx
CapIQ for information on analyst targets
submitted by SanitysLastRefuge to investing [link] [comments]

Yahoo Mail is more secure than Third Party apps connecting to it. HA HA

My yahoo mail just got the email below about Yahoo Mail web and IOS apps being more secure and a change to how third party apps must connect to Yahoo Mail.
I think its funny that Yahoo has had 2 data breaches at least in the last 10 years and their apps are so secure now. Hmm....
*******************
We love that you love using your Yahoo Mail. And we want to make sure you always have the best experience. That’s why we’re reaching out today.
We’ve noticed that you’re using non-Yahoo applications (such as third-party email, calendar, or contact applications) that may use a less secure sign-in method. To protect you and your data, Yahoo will no longer support the current sign-in functionality in your application starting on October 20, 2020. This means that you will need to take one of the steps below to continue using Yahoo Mail without interruption.
But don’t worry, you have options. Find an option that works best for you below:
Option 1: We recommend that you access your email using our free Yahoo Mail app for iOS and Android or simply go to mail.yahoo.com to access Yahoo Mail on the web.
Option 2: Keep your current, non-Yahoo app, BUT follow a few steps to get it to sync with our secure sign-in method. The steps vary across different email applications, but in most cases, you will have to remove your Yahoo account from the app and then add it back again to update the sign-in security. Use the links below to follow the specific steps for your current application:

Option 3: You can generate a one-time, unique password that will allow you to sign in to your account using your non-Yahoo email application. Once created, this password will continue to allow your app to securely sync your Yahoo email unless you sign out (or are signed out) from your app. You can find instructions on how to do this here.
If you want more details on these changes, please visit our help page. If you’ve already taken action, we’d like to think you haven’t read this far, but if you have . . . we sure appreciate the diligence!
Thanks for rocking that Yahoo Mail address!
Yours in your inbox,The Yahoo Team
submitted by AQDUyYN7cgbDa4eYtxTq to techsupport [link] [comments]

Buying Email Lists: The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing But The Truth

“There are countless ways to build lists, but trust is what builds relationships.” – Hunter Boyle

As marketers, you’re certainly juggling between different tasks such as building the sales funnel, boosting brand awareness, propelling engagement and crafting valuable content. Moreover, if you are using email as part of your marketing strategy (which of course you are), you’ve probably been approached by businesses offering you an email list to buy.

In this article, we’ll cover the following topics regarding buying email lists:

  1. When should you purchase or rent an email list?
  2. Is buying an email list such a horrible idea?
  3. How to grow your email list organically?
Ready to dive in?

Is There A Difference Between Purchased and Rented Email Lists?

We’d like to focus on two methods you could consider to acquire an email list – purchased and rented email lists.
Purchased email lists are a collection of email addresses usually based on demographic and/or psychographic information that vendors sell to any business who can pay the price. If your email list is provided by a third party, it’s considered purchased, rented, shared or could even be stolen.
Vendors build such lists via –
a) banner ads across the web b) industry trade shows at which people provide their info during the registration (to the expo, not the company providing the list) c) online surveyshave you ever completed an online IQ test and had to put in your email address to get the results? d) email harvesting (or scraping) e) stolen by a previous employee (it happens a lot)
Rented email lists are a collection of email addresses that businesses can use to send their marketing emails but they never actually own them. In fact, you may have to work with the provider in order to send out your email since they often do not release the email data to you at all, you’ll have to trust that they sent out your campaign and the resulting analytics they give to you.
Companies selling email lists claim to have thousands of legitimate email addresses. However, not everything that comes easy is good in the long run.

Could Buying an Email List Be The Kiss Of Death?

As much as buying email lists might seem like the golden ticket to achieving a boost in your subscriber numbers, don’t be fooled. It is not. It will do your business more harm than good. After all, having unengaged subscribers is worse than no subscribers at all.

Here are a few reasons why buying email lists is a huge no-no for email marketing –

1) The quality of the list is unreliable.

People selling email lists make all sorts of claims about what they are offering you. However, there’s a high possibility the lists will be of poor quality and have lots of missing or incorrect data (eg. wrong names), out-of-date info (eg. invalid, abandoned or hard bouncing email addresses) and even worse, illegally harvested email addresses (eg. people who haven’t opted-in to be on any list) which will almost certainly contain spam traps. Also, don’t forget that when buying an email list, you are not the only one that will have purchased it. Thus, all those people get some strange company’s email invading their inbox all at the same time!

2) Reputable ESPs will not allow you to send to purchased or rented email lists.

Email service providers enquire up-front whether your email lists are opted-in or not. At least most of them do or should. They will ask users how they acquired their lists, too, the privacy policy in place and what content they were expecting to receive when they gave their email address. Some might even enforce a double opt-in policy to ensure anti-spam laws are kept. Furthermore, if you’re not sending from a dedicated IP address, you’re probably sharing an IP with a few more email senders. If that’s the case, and you are using purchased or rented email lists, you risk getting blacklisted. If that happens, your reputation will affect all the other email senders on the shared IP and your account will be shut down to prevent more harm. After all, keeping an eye on users’ data, spam complaints and feedback loops allows your ESP to maintain good sender reputation as well as email deliverability for everyone.

3) People on purchased or rented email lists have no idea who you are.

Let’s say the companies selling you an email list didn’t scrape them but actually created them organically. It sounds great, doesn’t it? However, it’s not. People on those lists gave their explicit permission to be contacted. But, they did not give it to your business. They gave it to the list owner. Thus, even if you’ve been solicited by such companies, don’t fall for it. If you haven’t obtained the person’s permission yourself but still bombard the recipients’ inbox, you’re violating anti-spam laws.

4) You will be marked as a spammer.

No matter how perfectly designed, well written and packed with high-quality content your email is if it’s unsolicited the chance of people deleting it, or worse reporting it as spam, are extremely high. So, in order to avoid email Armageddon, we advise that you build your email lists organically.

5) You are violating anti-spam laws.

Email marketers are legally obliged to allow recipients to unsubscribe for email correspondence they have no desire to receive. They must be able to do that directly from the marketing email. Since the GDPR went into effect, it emphasised the importance of the opt-in side of the relationship. Thus, purchased/rented email lists are simply not compliant. Why? Because the contacts never actually consented to receiving your emails. Not to mention that most countries have laws against sending unsolicited emails – CAN-SPAM Act, CASL, CCPA, PDPA, LGPD, etc. and not being complaint can result in serious ramifications for your business. As best practice, email marketers should not only have a distinctly outlined unsubscribe option but also, obtain explicit consent from their recipients.

Grow Your Email List Organically

Instead of making the easy mistake of buying an email list, simply build them from scratch, organically. Here are a few tactics you can take advantage of –

1) Identify the audience you want to reach.

You must be as specific as you can possibly be about your target audience. You can create multiple lead magnets and place them on your website with each one appealing to targeted demographics and/or psychographics. Just make sure you have a separate list for each magnet for better segmentation.

2) Create content that will give people reason to give you their email address.

If your goal is to get people to sign up to your email list, you should ensure they have a reason for it. By offering to give them something of value – being it a checklist, whitepaper, webinars, ebooks, templates, etc. – before they even provide their email address, you are establishing a relationship of trust.

3) Use an email sign-up form.

An easy way of building and growing your email list is by including a simple newsletter sign-up form on all your blog posts. You can customise its design as well as what data you want to collect. You will see an increase in engagement as well as an increasing visitor return rate.

4) Use alternative channels to grow your email list.

Utilising your website by adding sign up forms and lead magnets are not the only ways for you to build and grow your email list. So, instead of taking the easy but very dangerous path of buying an email list, take advantage of your social media accounts to get more people to subscribe. Believe it or not, word spreads. If people who’ve already signed up to your email list enjoyed your content, they’ll recommend it to others and that’s exactly what you want. Your list won’t grow overnight. However, you’ll end up with a high-quality list of engaged subscribers and all without spending money on an unreliable, poor-quality purchased/rented email list that will get you blacklisted or worse and pollute the organically grown email subscribers within the same list.

5) Choose a trustworthy ESP.

If you’ve already made the mistake of buying an email list, scrap it. And don’t even think about sending email blasts from your email client (ex. Gmail, Yahoo or Outlook). You won’t succeed. Your ISP will most definitely stop – or even penalise – you for attempting it. Just choose an email service provider that will offer crucial features such as dedicated IP and spam testing.

Final Thoughts

Buying email lists might seem like an easy and quick option when it comes to growing your email list. However, as tempted as you might be to take it, don’t. It’s a huge waste of money and a definite no-no if you want your email marketing efforts to be successful.
Using purchased/rented email lists is not only a poor alternative to building and growing your email list organically, but it’s also damaging to your brand, harmful to email deliverability, has a high potential of flagging you as a spammer and will lead to poor results. It is also in direct violation of anti-spam laws.
Bottom line, never buy email lists. The only way to ensure your marketing emails will reach the recipients’ inboxes and be read is by having an opted-in email list that has been built (and grown) the right way.
submitted by emailout to Emailmarketing [link] [comments]

The Phoenix Suns had a fantastic offseason (crossposted to r/nba)

Trigger warning: this post is super long, but I try to really break down each of the Suns' moves over the past month and explain how they all fit into the grand plan that James Jones has for the organization going forward. It was really written for NBA fans who don't follow the Suns super closely, and who may not understand what's happening here in Phoenix.

*********\*

For those of you who are not Suns fans or who don't closely follow the team, you may not have noticed that the Suns — contrary to popular opinion — have actually had a fairly successful offseason. It's true that if you look at each move individually, they don't necessarily make a ton of sense. Paying Indiana to take TJ Warren is a good example of this, and we will talk more about this transaction later. Paying Ricky Rubio $51 million for three years is another example. But if you look at all of their moves together, and consider both where the organization was coming from and what they've said publicly about their plan going forward, then a different picture emerges.

The Past
I won't even go into the years of dysfunction that has marked the Phoenix Suns organization. We all know how bad it's been. We all know about the turnover, the losses, the goats. Instead, to provide a base level of context for what we've done as a team over the past month, let's just look at the Suns roster from the end of last season:
  1. PG: Tyler Johnson / Elie Okobo / De'Anthony Melton
  2. SG: Devin Booker / Josh Jackson / Jamal Crawford / Troy Daniels / Jimmer Fredette
  3. SF: TJ Warren / Kelly Oubre / Mikal Bridges / George King
  4. PF: Dragan Bender / Ray Spalding
  5. C: Deandre Ayton / Richaun Holmes
Although this is actually a much-improved roster from the beginning of last season, I think we can all agree that it was still poorly constructed at best. Several players were playing out of position or in ill-defined roles, and the overall level of talent was severely lacking. Our bench was possibly the worst in the league. Tyler Johnson was our best point guard, but he's not a point guard. Okobo was just outplayed in summer league by undrafted rookie point guard Jalen Lecque, who played high school ball last season. Melton spent time in the G League as recently as February. Jimmer Fredette came over from China, went 0-13 on threes in six games, and ball-hogged Devin Fucking Booker out of a 60-point game. (The Warriors, sensing an opportunity, picked Jimmer up for their summer league team. He quit after two games.) Jamal Crawford has said he doesn't want to retire, but remains unsigned, even by the Lakers. The Lakers did take Troy Daniels, who shoots well when open, but does absolutely nothing else. Josh Jackson skipped a fan meet-and-greet (which was treated as a huge deal locally), got arrested at a music festival, and was recently accused of hot-boxing his baby. On the court, not only did Jackson show little improvement from his rookie season, he often looked worse. One gets the feeling that he never plays basketball outside of mandatory team practices. And when he does go to practice, sometimes he is so hungover that he throws up on the basketball court.
So that takes us through the guard positions. At small forward, we actually had some talent. TJ Warren developed a three-point shot out of nowhere and was suddenly our most reliable perimeter shooter, hitting 43% on 4.2 attempts per game, which is actually elite. (He missed Basketball Reference's eligibility cutoff by 20 attempts, but had he been eligible his percentage would have ranked in the top 10 league-wide.) But he was a black hole on offense (1.5 assists in 32 minutes per game), played zero defense, and always missed tons of games. During his five seasons in the league, he has averaged 52 games per season, and has never played more than 66. Last year he played 43. Our winning percentage was exactly the same in the games he didn't play as in the games he did: 23%. He was a ultimately a non-factor.
Our other two small forwards were Kelly Oubre, Jr. and Mikal Bridges. Both were (and continue to be) fan favorites and both had an obvious positive impact on the team. The Suns went 6-6 with Oubre in the starting lineup last season, during which stretch he averaged 20 points, 5 rebounds, 2 steals, and a block. James Jones getting Oubre for Trevor Ariza mid-season was nothing less than a miracle — compare our 50% win rate with Oubre in the starting lineup to Ariza's win rate of 15%. You read that right: in games that Ariza started, the Suns were 4-22. If the Suns had won games at Ariza's rate all season, we would have finished with 12 wins instead of 19. If you are wondering why Suns fans were so adamant about re-signing Oubre — and so happy when we finally did — it's because of how noticeably everything changed once he got here. On top of his on-court impact, he was a huge boon to our team culture. He embraced the city, became close with Booker and others, had a positive attitude, and played his heart out every single game. Plus, he's super cute.
Bridges is also super cute, but more importantly, in case you didn't know, he's already an elite defender. This is not hyperbole — as a rookie, he was one of the most intuitive defenders in the entire league. Just take a break here for the next 11 minutes and watch his defensive highlights, they're incredible. (Also, 11 minutes of defensive highlights from just the first half of his first season? Come on!) He's really in tune with the rhythm of the NBA game. He gets his hands on seemingly every ball, he stays in front of everyone, he reads passes and cuts before they happen, he rotates on a tight string, and even when his gambles don't pay off, he is usually somehow able to recover his position — the dude is a generational stud on defense. He was our best defender by far with plenty of room to get even better. His shot wasn't quite as good as we'd hoped (34% from three), but his mechanics and decision-making are solid and he projects to be a top-tier 3&D player in this league for a very long time. He was the only Suns player to play all 82 games and he led the team in total minutes played. As a rookie. If you watched every Suns game last year like I did, you saw Mikal Bridges more than any other player on our team.
At power forward we had Dragan Bender and Ray Spalding. Ray might make this year's team? Who knows, but he's currently in summer league trying to make his case. Dragan Bender is an unsigned free agent who I'm starting to believe never actually existed... but who is nevertheless maybe being considered by the Cavs? I'm sure that will work out well.
At center, we had Deandre Ayton, who was historically efficient and frustratingly under-utilized. He averaged 16 points and 10 boards, with an effective field goal percentage of 58.5% (16th in the league). In NBA history, there have been 26 rookies who have averaged 10+ points and 10+ rebounds per game. Ayton has the highest true shooting percentage of all of them, at .608. Other names on this list include David Robinson, Karl-Anthony Towns, Alonzo Mourning, Shaquille O'Neal, Tim Duncan, Dwight Howard, Hakeem Olajuwon, Blake Griffin, and Larry Bird. Ayton was more efficient than all of them.
Backing up Ayton, and often also playing the 4, was Richaun Holmes, who brought a ton of energy, especially in the form of highlight blocks and alley-oops, but little in the way of basketball IQ or skill. He was picked up in free agency by the Kings. (So was Trevor Ariza, by the way.... for $25 million over two years! Kings, listen, you're taking this 'Sun Kings' thing a little too seriously. Stop sifting through our trash.)

The Present
So that's where we were going into this offseason. On April 11th of this year, the Suns named James Jones as the new GM. He had been the interim co-GM with Trevor Bukstein since the firing of Ryan McDonough last October, but now the title was his alone (Bukstein was named Assistant GM). Jones has outlined his general vision for the team on several occasions; most recently, he said this:
"We set out in the summer to fill our power forward and point guard position. We did that via the draft (and free agency). We wanted to add positional depth and balance. We did that by adding Frank (Kaminsky), adding Aron Baynes. The addition of Ricky Rubio addressed the point guard position, Dario Saric addressed our power forward position."
“And then from there, in the draft adding Cam (Johnson) and Ty (Jerome), as well as Jalen (Lecque), gave us some more guard depth and we made some moves, some transactions that kind of cleared some cap space for us to be able to make these moves happen and to kind of clear a pathway for guys to compete for an opportunity to move forward for us.”
It has become clear that, despite what you think of the moves the Suns have made, they have made them according to a plan: to fill the aforementioned weaknesses at the point guard and power forward positions, to draft mature rookies who are high-character guys who can shoot, to construct a balanced roster with clearly defined roles, and to build a team that complements the talents of Ayton and Booker. This is exactly what they did.
It's important to keep in mind that having a plan and executing that plan are two different things. Sometimes you don't execute your original plan because you're incompetent, or you failed to foresee some key element that made your plan unlikely or impossible. Other times, your plan doesn't work out because of factors beyond your control. In the Suns' case, the favored plan going into this offseason revolved around getting either the first or second pick in the draft. Immediately, that would meet our power forward (Zion) or point guard (Ja Morant) needs and make us both instantly better and more attractive as a free agent destination. Not only would we have incredible young talent, but we would have additional cap room that wouldn't have to be used on whichever position we selected in the draft. Instead of having to pay for both positions, we would only have to pay for one, allowing us to splurge and still have balance. Getting the first or second pick would have been a game-changer, obviously. As it was for the Pelicans, and as it would have been for any team.
What is encouraging is that the Suns treated this plan like the long shot that it was, and developed backup plans for the statistically likely event that we didn't get one of the first two (or three, or four) picks. Having a backup plan may seem like a fairly normal thing for a GM to have, but the fact that we had one — and more than one — has been a revelation.

Anyway, here is a timeline of our moves over the past month:

The Future
After all of these moves, here is what our roster looks like right now:
  1. PG: Ricky Rubio / Ty Jerome / Jevon Carter / Elie Okobo / Jalen Lecque
  2. SG: Devin Booker / Tyler Johnson
  3. SF: Kelly Oubre / Mikal Bridges / Cameron Johnson
  4. PF: Dario Saric / Frank Kaminsky
  5. C: Deandre Ayton / Aron Baynes
One immediate takeaway is that the Suns improved at nearly every position. Let's start with the guards. Rubio, obviously, is a massive upgrade at the point guard position. I mean, come on: our starting point guards last year included Isaiah Canaan, De'Anthony Melton, Elie Okobo, and my 10-year-old daughter. Tyler Johnson, our most effective point guard last year, only played in 13 games and is not actually a point guard. With Rubio on the team, Johnson is now back in his more natural two-guard spot, and a backup at that, giving us much-needed guard depth. He can still run backup point if he has to, but that responsibility will fall primarily to Ty Jerome, who can learn the role under Rubio's tutelage while primarily facing other teams' second units. Speaking of point guards, at first glance it looks like we have once again swung the pendulum and now have way too many of them, but this will likely thin out a bit before the season starts. My guess is that we will let Okobo or Carter go and assign Lecque to the G League, unless Lecque continues to impress through camp and preseason play.
At the shooting guard spot, Devin Booker will have his best season yet, and why wouldn't he? He's improved every season so far, he's still only 22, and he's on by far the best team of his career, with his best coach to date. Statistically, I think he will score about the same as last year, but on fewer shots and much improved efficiency — if you don't follow the Suns and are wondering why his three-point percentage was not great last season, let me tell you: he took a ton of forced shots late in possessions, and not because he wanted to. He was consistently double-teamed, and although Booker is a willing passer with good court vision, we just didn't have the personnel to punish those double teams. With Rubio handling the ball most of the time, Booker will almost certainly average fewer assists next season, but go back to doing what he does best: coming off screens and getting the ball in rhythm for nice, clean looks. If he gets doubled coming off screens, he can and will make the easy next pass to either Ayton on the block or the shooter in the corner, which will actually be a shooter this time around. This is much different than being doubled way out past the three-point line, with no angle to Ayton and no shooters on the wings. Look for his efficiency to really make a jump.
At small forward, we lost some offensive punch by getting rid of TJ Warren, but we maintain consistency with Oubre and Bridges, either of whom could end up starting, and either of whom would be killer on the second unit. Neither of them are the pure natural scorer that Warren is, but they are both better all-around players who contribute on defense, crash the boards, and aren't hurt all the time. They are also both young and improving, and both should be better across the board than they were last season. Oubre is the better offensive player, although Bridges has higher shooting upside, while Bridges is easily the better defender. Which one ends up starting will likely come down to whether new head coach Monty Williams prefers to emphasize offense or defense in that first unit.
Speaking of Williams, he recently said that the starting power forward spot is also up for grabs, but I think everyone would be pretty surprised if Saric wasn't in that role for game 1. I said it before and I'll say it again: this is a significant upgrade for us, regardless of what you think of Saric. He brings savvy and shooting, and provides Rubio and Booker with yet another offensive option who can knock down shots but doesn't need the ball a ton. His presence on the floor will really let us space things out and give Rubio all the passing angles he could wish for, while at the same time making it easier for us to punish double-teams by whipping the ball around to the open man.
Perhaps even more impressive than the upgrades to our starting five are the upgrades to our bench, which actually consists of recognizable NBA players now. Last season, you might have turned on a Suns game and saw Elie Okobo paired with Jamal Crawford in the backcourt, while Josh Jackson and Dragan Bender spotted up on the wings. Those days, thank the lord, are gone. Now our second unit is Ty Jerome running point, Tyler Johnson at the 2, Bridges or Oubre at small forward, and Kaminsky and Baynes as our bigs. (It's rare that first and second units play in clear-cut five-man rotations like that — there's usually a lot of overlap in substitution patterns — but you get the point.) Aside from Jerome, who is an unproven rookie, those are actual competent NBA players who can hang with and even outplay other second units.
On top of all that, we have Monty Williams as our new head coach. Like so many of our other moves, this may not seem like that big of a deal to outsiders. Ho hum, right? Let me tell you: it's a big deal, and not just because the Lakers wanted him, too. Williams is Booker's fifth head coach in five years. Three of the coaches Booker played for were Earl Watson, Jay Triano, and Igor Kokoskov. Not exactly a bunch of Popoviches. Jeff Hornacek (oh my god) was probably the best of the bunch. Booker has played for more head coaches than Dirk Nowitzki (21 seasons), Tim Duncan (19 seasons), John Stockton (19 seasons), Dwyane Wade (16 seasons), Michael Jordan (15 seasons), and Bill Russell (13 seasons). I guess Booker can comfort himself with the fact that Jamal Crawford has played for 19 coaches in 19 seasons — truly a mark of greatness. Williams has impressed so far in interviews, is gelling well with GM James Jones, and has the full respect and command of the team — a far cry from the situation last year, where the assistant coaches were running the show and players couldn't understand what Kokoskov was even saying.
Finally, not only have the Suns drastically improved their roster from last year, they have done so in a way that enables them to continue improving in the future. They have a better GM, a better head coach, and better players. They have Devin Booker locked up through the 2023-24 season. They have avoided long-term albatross contracts, enabling them to maintain flexibility going forward: the only other players besides Booker who have contracts beyond the next three seasons are the rookies we just acquired, who will still be on their rookie deals. Our new state-of-the-art practice facility will be complete in 2021, Booker and Ayton will be entering their primes, and the Suns will have the flexibility to create max cap space and lure a top free agent.
A huge caveat here is that the West is a bloodbath. The Suns could have a dramatically better team this season, which we do, and still not sniff the playoffs. Which of these teams are the Suns going to finish ahead of in the standings?
  1. Nuggets
  2. Clippers
  3. Jazz
  4. Rockets
  5. Lakers
  6. Warriors
  7. Blazers
  8. Spurs
The answer is none of them, barring major injuries. Even if the Suns outplay every other team in the western conference — the Mavs, Kings, Grizzlies, Pelicans, Timberwolves, and Thunder — that would still leave them in 9th place. And some of these other teams might be better too, on top of already having been better than the Suns last year. It's a tough hill to climb.
And yet.
The Suns, at the end of the day, got better. Maybe that only translates to 30 wins this upcoming season, maybe it translates to 35. That's not world-beating, but that's still a big step forward, and if they improve on that record with another 5-10 wins in the 2020-21 season, suddenly the Suns are an actual playoff contender with two established stars, two years of consistency and improvement under their belts, a surprisingly competent front office, a stable coaching staff, an attractive new practice facility in Scottsdale, and cap space to sign another stud.
I mean, at the end of the day, who really knows. Things in the NBA can and often do change overnight. But at least the Suns, for once, have a plan.
submitted by nonanonymo to suns [link] [comments]

Nurse: " I think he's[Pascal] good enough to play both positions" when asked about playing SF by William Lou in exclusive interview

https://ca.sports.yahoo.com/news/raptors-coach-nick-nurse-wants-pascal-siakam-to-become-the-man-225419091.html
nick nurse says it's a process, wants pascal to become the primary scorer, primary option on offense.
Listen to the interview, it's quite informative, contrary to popular beliefs where people thought pascal's best position was PF when in reality, nick nurse had pascal play off-ball at PF when he has point-forward capabilities, thinks he can play anywhere.

“I just think his next step in progression is being ‘The Man,’” Nurse said in an exclusive interview with William Lou of Yahoo Sports.
“Instead of being a complementary guy next to ‘The Man’ he’s gotta be ‘The Man’ — the primary scorer and the primary option and the late-game scorer.

edit: just to alleviate some anxiety, nick nurse has already done this at times during the season, we sometimes would play like we had two SFs but explicitly placed them at "3" and "4" in the starting lineup, click spoiler for more context:
pascal siakam has occasionally been playing "smallforward/3" on a lot of posessions without explicitly been slothed as the small forward/3.. and it makes pascal and the raptors a better team, which is why nick nurse had stated the controversially said quote in an interview that he may start pascal at the 3 next season
given his combination of speed/athleticism/ball handling and ability to take small forwards(6'7 7'2 wingspan, defender mikale bridges) off the dribble without a screen and HIGH ball iq and facilitating skills (see link, see link of nick nurseagreeing, andlowry,cj miles after the game) , and high ball iq as a facilitator, even without an above the break 3 or conventional 45% on 4 attempts mid-range from other starting SFs (already 41% mid-range fg on 1.7 fga attempts in the playoffs, 61% on 2.1 fga in the finals) shot thank to his floater game/slashing and footwork, similar to how pop uses demar without a 3pt shot) , and awareness to find the open man when attracting a double team, nick nurse had done it all year, and had kawhi play off-ball al ot of the time, which it why it(kawhi and pascal) was like having a SG and SF slothed at 3 and 4, or two SFs at 3 and 4 repectively. and even with ibaka on the court with gasol and pascal, we used ibaka playing the "5" still running the exact same plays for him, we have gasol on the perimeter for high post facilitating and 3pt spacing, which is why it works.
submitted by Eagerbeaver98 to torontoraptors [link] [comments]

Buying Email Lists: The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing But The Truth

Buying Email Lists: The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing But The Truth

“There are countless ways to build lists, but trust is what builds relationships.” – Hunter Boyle

As marketers, you’re certainly juggling between different tasks such as building the sales funnel, boosting brand awareness, propelling engagement and crafting valuable content. Moreover, if you are using email as part of your marketing strategy (which of course you are), you’ve probably been approached by businesses offering you an email list to buy.

In this article, we’ll cover the following topics regarding buying email lists:

  1. When should you purchase or rent an email list?
  2. Is buying an email list such a horrible idea?
  3. How to grow your email list organically?
Ready to dive in?
Thinking about buying email data?

Is There A Difference Between Purchased and Rented Email Lists?

We’d like to focus on two methods you could consider to acquire an email list – purchased and rented email lists.
Purchased email lists are a collection of email addresses usually based on demographic and/or psychographic information that vendors sell to any business who can pay the price. If your email list is provided by a third party, it’s considered purchased, rented, shared or could even be stolen.
Vendors build such lists via –
a) banner ads across the web b) industry trade shows at which people provide their info during the registration (to the expo, not the company providing the list) c) online surveyshave you ever completed an online IQ test and had to put in your email address to get the results? d) email harvesting (or scraping) e) stolen by a previous employee (it happens a lot)
Rented email lists are a collection of email addresses that businesses can use to send their marketing emails but they never actually own them. In fact, you may have to work with the provider in order to send out your email since they often do not release the email data to you at all, you’ll have to trust that they sent out your campaign and the resulting analytics they give to you.
Companies selling email lists claim to have thousands of legitimate email addresses. However, not everything that comes easy is good in the long run.

Could Buying an Email List Be The Kiss Of Death?

As much as buying email lists might seem like the golden ticket to achieving a boost in your subscriber numbers, don’t be fooled. It is not. It will do your business more harm than good. After all, having unengaged subscribers is worse than no subscribers at all.

Here are a few reasons why buying email lists is a huge no-no for email marketing –

1) The quality of the list is unreliable.

People selling email lists make all sorts of claims about what they are offering you. However, there’s a high possibility the lists will be of poor quality and have lots of missing or incorrect data (eg. wrong names), out-of-date info (eg. invalid, abandoned or hard bouncing email addresses) and even worse, illegally harvested email addresses (eg. people who haven’t opted-in to be on any list) which will almost certainly contain spam traps. Also, don’t forget that when buying an email list, you are not the only one that will have purchased it. Thus, all those people get some strange company’s email invading their inbox all at the same time!

2) Reputable ESPs will not allow you to send to purchased or rented email lists.

Email service providers enquire up-front whether your email lists are opted-in or not. At least most of them do or should. They will ask users how they acquired their lists, too, the privacy policy in place and what content they were expecting to receive when they gave their email address. Some might even enforce a double opt-in policy to ensure anti-spam laws are kept. Furthermore, if you’re not sending from a dedicated IP address, you’re probably sharing an IP with a few more email senders. If that’s the case, and you are using purchased or rented email lists, you risk getting blacklisted. If that happens, your reputation will affect all the other email senders on the shared IP and your account will be shut down to prevent more harm. After all, keeping an eye on users’ data, spam complaints and feedback loops allows your ESP to maintain good sender reputation as well as email deliverability for everyone.

3) People on purchased or rented email lists have no idea who you are.

Let’s say the companies selling you an email list didn’t scrape them but actually created them organically. It sounds great, doesn’t it? However, it’s not. People on those lists gave their explicit permission to be contacted. But, they did not give it to your business. They gave it to the list owner. Thus, even if you’ve been solicited by such companies, don’t fall for it. If you haven’t obtained the person’s permission yourself but still bombard the recipients’ inbox, you’re violating anti-spam laws.

4) You will be marked as a spammer.

No matter how perfectly designed, well written and packed with high-quality content your email is if it’s unsolicited the chance of people deleting it, or worse reporting it as spam, are extremely high. So, in order to avoid email Armageddon, we advise that you build your email lists organically.

5) You are violating anti-spam laws.

Email marketers are legally obliged to allow recipients to unsubscribe for email correspondence they have no desire to receive. They must be able to do that directly from the marketing email. Since the GDPR went into effect, it emphasised the importance of the opt-in side of the relationship. Thus, purchased/rented email lists are simply not compliant. Why? Because the contacts never actually consented to receiving your emails. Not to mention that most countries have laws against sending unsolicited emails – CAN-SPAM Act, CASL, CCPA, PDPA, LGPD, etc. and not being complaint can result in serious ramifications for your business. As best practice, email marketers should not only have a distinctly outlined unsubscribe option but also, obtain explicit consent from their recipients.

Grow Your Email List Organically

Instead of making the easy mistake of buying an email list, simply build them from scratch, organically. Here are a few tactics you can take advantage of –

1) Identify the audience you want to reach.

You must be as specific as you can possibly be about your target audience. You can create multiple lead magnets and place them on your website with each one appealing to targeted demographics and/or psychographics. Just make sure you have a separate list for each magnet for better segmentation.

2) Create content that will give people reason to give you their email address.

If your goal is to get people to sign up to your email list, you should ensure they have a reason for it. By offering to give them something of value – being it a checklist, whitepaper, webinars, ebooks, templates, etc. – before they even provide their email address, you are establishing a relationship of trust.

3) Use an email sign-up form.

An easy way of building and growing your email list is by including a simple newsletter sign-up form on all your blog posts. You can customise its design as well as what data you want to collect. You will see an increase in engagement as well as an increasing visitor return rate.

4) Use alternative channels to grow your email list.

Utilising your website by adding sign up forms and lead magnets are not the only ways for you to build and grow your email list. So, instead of taking the easy but very dangerous path of buying an email list, take advantage of your social media accounts to get more people to subscribe. Believe it or not, word spreads. If people who’ve already signed up to your email list enjoyed your content, they’ll recommend it to others and that’s exactly what you want. Your list won’t grow overnight. However, you’ll end up with a high-quality list of engaged subscribers and all without spending money on an unreliable, poor-quality purchased/rented email list that will get you blacklisted or worse and pollute the organically grown email subscribers within the same list.

5) Choose a trustworthy ESP.

If you’ve already made the mistake of buying an email list, scrap it. And don’t even think about sending email blasts from your email client (ex. Gmail, Yahoo or Outlook). You won’t succeed. Your ISP will most definitely stop – or even penalise – you for attempting it. Just choose an email service provider that will offer crucial features such as dedicated IP and spam testing.

Final Thoughts

Buying email lists might seem like an easy and quick option when it comes to growing your email list. However, as tempted as you might be to take it, don’t. It’s a huge waste of money and a definite no-no if you want your email marketing efforts to be successful.
Using purchased/rented email lists is not only a poor alternative to building and growing your email list organically, but it’s also damaging to your brand, harmful to email deliverability, has a high potential of flagging you as a spammer and will lead to poor results. It is also in direct violation of anti-spam laws.
Bottom line, never buy email lists. The only way to ensure your marketing emails will reach the recipients’ inboxes and be read is by having an opted-in email list that has been built (and grown) the right way.
This article was originally published on 3 March and can be found here.

Open your Unlimited Sends one-month free trial today – after your first month with us you can switch to our FreeForever account giving you 12,500 sends to 2,500 contacts each and every month for free, forever. Corporate email marketing? Contact us.

submitted by emailout to u/emailout [link] [comments]

The Phoenix Suns' offseason was better than you think

Trigger warning: this post is super long, but I try to really break down each of the Suns' moves over the past month and explain how they all fit into the grand plan that James Jones has for the organization going forward. It was really written for NBA fans who don't follow the Suns super closely, and who may not understand what's happening here in Phoenix.

*********\*

For those of you who are not Suns fans or who don't closely follow the team, you may not have noticed that the Suns — contrary to popular opinion — have actually had a fairly successful offseason. It's true that if you look at each move individually, they don't necessarily make a ton of sense. Paying Indiana to take TJ Warren is a good example of this, and we will talk more about this transaction later. Paying Ricky Rubio $51 million for three years is another example. But if you look at all of their moves together, and consider both where the organization was coming from and what they've said publicly about their plan going forward, then a different picture emerges.

The Past
I won't even go into the years of dysfunction that has marked the Phoenix Suns organization. We all know how bad it's been. We all know about the turnover, the losses, the goats. Instead, to provide a base level of context for what we've done as a team over the past month, let's just look at the Suns roster from the end of last season:
  1. PG: Tyler Johnson / Elie Okobo / De'Anthony Melton
  2. SG: Devin Booker / Josh Jackson / Jamal Crawford / Troy Daniels / Jimmer Fredette
  3. SF: TJ Warren / Kelly Oubre / Mikal Bridges / George King
  4. PF: Dragan Bender / Ray Spalding
  5. C: Deandre Ayton / Richaun Holmes
Although this is actually a much-improved roster from the beginning of last season, I think we can all agree that it was still poorly constructed at best. Several players were playing out of position or in ill-defined roles, and the overall level of talent was severely lacking. Our bench was possibly the worst in the league. Tyler Johnson was our best point guard, but he's not a point guard. Okobo was just outplayed in summer league by undrafted rookie point guard Jalen Lecque, who played high school ball last season. Melton spent time in the G League as recently as February. Jimmer Fredette came over from China, went 0-13 on threes in six games, and ball-hogged Devin Fucking Booker out of a 60-point game. (The Warriors, sensing an opportunity, picked Jimmer up for their summer league team. He quit after two games.) Jamal Crawford has said he doesn't want to retire, but remains unsigned, even by the Lakers. The Lakers did take Troy Daniels, who shoots well when open, but does absolutely nothing else. Josh Jackson skipped a fan meet-and-greet (which was treated as a huge deal locally), got arrested at a music festival, and was recently accused of hot-boxing his baby. On the court, not only did Jackson show little improvement from his rookie season, he often looked worse. One gets the feeling that he never plays basketball outside of mandatory team practices. And when he does go to practice, sometimes he is so hungover that he throws up on the basketball court.
So that takes us through the guard positions. At small forward, we actually had some talent. TJ Warren developed a three-point shot out of nowhere and was suddenly our most reliable perimeter shooter, hitting 43% on 4.2 attempts per game, which is actually elite. (He missed Basketball Reference's eligibility cutoff by 20 attempts, but had he been eligible his percentage would have ranked in the top 10 league-wide.) But he was a black hole on offense (1.5 assists in 32 minutes per game), played zero defense, and always missed tons of games. During his five seasons in the league, he has averaged 52 games per season, and has never played more than 66. Last year he played 43. Our winning percentage was exactly the same in the games he didn't play as in the games he did: 23%. He was a ultimately a non-factor.
Our other two small forwards were Kelly Oubre, Jr. and Mikal Bridges. Both were (and continue to be) fan favorites and both had an obvious positive impact on the team. The Suns went 6-6 with Oubre in the starting lineup last season, during which stretch he averaged 20 points, 5 rebounds, 2 steals, and a block. James Jones getting Oubre for Trevor Ariza mid-season was nothing less than a miracle — compare our 50% win rate with Oubre in the starting lineup to Ariza's win rate of 15%. You read that right: in games that Ariza started, the Suns were 4-22. If the Suns had won games at Ariza's rate all season, we would have finished with 12 wins instead of 19. If you are wondering why Suns fans were so adamant about re-signing Oubre — and so happy when we finally did — it's because of how noticeably everything changed once he got here. On top of his on-court impact, he was a huge boon to our team culture. He embraced the city, became close with Booker and others, had a positive attitude, and played his heart out every single game. Plus, he's super cute.
Bridges is also super cute, but more importantly, in case you didn't know, he's already an elite defender. This is not hyperbole — as a rookie, he was one of the most intuitive defenders in the entire league. Just take a break here for the next 11 minutes and watch his defensive highlights, they're incredible. (Also, 11 minutes of defensive highlights from just the first half of his first season? Come on!) He's really in tune with the rhythm of the NBA game. He gets his hands on seemingly every ball, he stays in front of everyone, he reads passes and cuts before they happen, he rotates on a tight string, and even when his gambles don't pay off, he is usually somehow able to recover his position — the dude is a generational stud on defense. He was our best defender by far with plenty of room to get even better. His shot wasn't quite as good as we'd hoped (34% from three), but his mechanics and decision-making are solid and he projects to be a top-tier 3&D player in this league for a very long time. He was the only Suns player to play all 82 games and he led the team in total minutes played. As a rookie. If you watched every Suns game last year like I did, you saw Mikal Bridges more than any other player on our team.
At power forward we had Dragan Bender and Ray Spalding. Ray might make this year's team? Who knows, but he's currently in summer league trying to make his case. Dragan Bender is an unsigned free agent who I'm starting to believe never actually existed... but who is nevertheless maybe being considered by the Cavs? I'm sure that will work out well.
At center, we had Deandre Ayton, who was historically efficient and frustratingly under-utilized. He averaged 16 points and 10 boards, with an effective field goal percentage of 58.5% (16th in the league). In NBA history, there have been 26 rookies who have averaged 10+ points and 10+ rebounds per game. Ayton has the highest true shooting percentage of all of them, at .608. Other names on this list include David Robinson, Karl-Anthony Towns, Alonzo Mourning, Shaquille O'Neal, Tim Duncan, Dwight Howard, Hakeem Olajuwon, Blake Griffin, and Larry Bird. Ayton was more efficient than all of them.
Backing up Ayton, and often also playing the 4, was Richaun Holmes, who brought a ton of energy, especially in the form of highlight blocks and alley-oops, but little in the way of basketball IQ or skill. He was picked up in free agency by the Kings. (So was Trevor Ariza, by the way.... for $25 million over two years! Kings, listen, you're taking this 'Sun Kings' thing a little too seriously. Stop sifting through our trash.)

The Present
So that's where we were going into this offseason. On April 11th of this year, the Suns named James Jones as the new GM. He had been the interim co-GM with Trevor Bukstein since the firing of Ryan McDonough last October, but now the title was his alone (Bukstein was named Assistant GM). Jones has outlined his general vision for the team on several occasions; most recently, he said this:
"We set out in the summer to fill our power forward and point guard position. We did that via the draft (and free agency). We wanted to add positional depth and balance. We did that by adding Frank (Kaminsky), adding Aron Baynes. The addition of Ricky Rubio addressed the point guard position, Dario Saric addressed our power forward position."
“And then from there, in the draft adding Cam (Johnson) and Ty (Jerome), as well as Jalen (Lecque), gave us some more guard depth and we made some moves, some transactions that kind of cleared some cap space for us to be able to make these moves happen and to kind of clear a pathway for guys to compete for an opportunity to move forward for us.”
It has become clear that, despite what you think of the moves the Suns have made, they have made them according to a plan: to fill the aforementioned weaknesses at the point guard and power forward positions, to draft mature rookies who are high-character guys who can shoot, to construct a balanced roster with clearly defined roles, and to build a team that complements the talents of Ayton and Booker. This is exactly what they did.
It's important to keep in mind that having a plan and executing that plan are two different things. Sometimes you don't execute your original plan because you're incompetent, or you failed to foresee some key element that made your plan unlikely or impossible. Other times, your plan doesn't work out because of factors beyond your control. In the Suns' case, the favored plan going into this offseason revolved around getting either the first or second pick in the draft. Immediately, that would meet our power forward (Zion) or point guard (Ja Morant) needs and make us both instantly better and more attractive as a free agent destination. Not only would we have incredible young talent, but we would have additional cap room that wouldn't have to be used on whichever position we selected in the draft. Instead of having to pay for both positions, we would only have to pay for one, allowing us to splurge and still have balance. Getting the first or second pick would have been a game-changer, obviously. As it was for the Pelicans, and as it would have been for any team.
What is encouraging is that the Suns treated this plan like the long shot that it was, and developed backup plans for the statistically likely event that we didn't get one of the first two (or three, or four) picks. Having a backup plan may seem like a fairly normal thing for a GM to have, but the fact that we had one — and more than one — has been a revelation.

Anyway, here is a timeline of our moves over the past month:

The Future
After all of these moves, here is what our roster looks like right now:
  1. PG: Ricky Rubio / Ty Jerome / Jevon Carter / Elie Okobo / Jalen Lecque
  2. SG: Devin Booker / Tyler Johnson
  3. SF: Kelly Oubre / Mikal Bridges / Cameron Johnson
  4. PF: Dario Saric / Frank Kaminsky
  5. C: Deandre Ayton / Aron Baynes
One immediate takeaway is that the Suns improved at nearly every position. Let's start with the guards. Rubio, obviously, is a massive upgrade at the point guard position. I mean, come on: our starting point guards last year included Isaiah Canaan, De'Anthony Melton, Elie Okobo, and my 10-year-old daughter. Tyler Johnson, our most effective point guard last year, only played in 13 games and is not actually a point guard. With Rubio on the team, Johnson is now back in his more natural two-guard spot, and a backup at that, giving us much-needed guard depth. He can still run backup point if he has to, but that responsibility will fall primarily to Ty Jerome, who can learn the role under Rubio's tutelage while primarily facing other teams' second units. Speaking of point guards, at first glance it looks like we have once again swung the pendulum and now have way too many of them, but this will likely thin out a bit before the season starts. My guess is that we will let Okobo or Carter go and assign Lecque to the G League, unless Lecque continues to impress through camp and preseason play.
At the shooting guard spot, Devin Booker will have his best season yet, and why wouldn't he? He's improved every season so far, he's still only 22, and he's on by far the best team of his career, with his best coach to date. Statistically, I think he will score about the same as last year, but on fewer shots and much improved efficiency — if you don't follow the Suns and are wondering why his three-point percentage was not great last season, let me tell you: he took a ton of forced shots late in possessions, and not because he wanted to. He was consistently double-teamed, and although Booker is a willing passer with good court vision, we just didn't have the personnel to punish those double teams. With Rubio handling the ball most of the time, Booker will almost certainly average fewer assists next season, but go back to doing what he does best: coming off screens and getting the ball in rhythm for nice, clean looks. If he gets doubled coming off screens, he can and will make the easy next pass to either Ayton on the block or the shooter in the corner, which will actually be a shooter this time around. This is much different than being doubled way out past the three-point line, with no angle to Ayton and no shooters on the wings. Look for his efficiency to really make a jump.
At small forward, we lost some offensive punch by getting rid of TJ Warren, but we maintain consistency with Oubre and Bridges, either of whom could end up starting, and either of whom would be killer on the second unit. Neither of them are the pure natural scorer that Warren is, but they are both better all-around players who contribute on defense, crash the boards, and aren't hurt all the time. They are also both young and improving, and both should be better across the board than they were last season. Oubre is the better offensive player, although Bridges has higher shooting upside, while Bridges is easily the better defender. Which one ends up starting will likely come down to whether new head coach Monty Williams prefers to emphasize offense or defense in that first unit.
Speaking of Williams, he recently said that the starting power forward spot is also up for grabs, but I think everyone would be pretty surprised if Saric wasn't in that role for game 1. I said it before and I'll say it again: this is a significant upgrade for us, regardless of what you think of Saric. He brings savvy and shooting, and provides Rubio and Booker with yet another offensive option who can knock down shots but doesn't need the ball a ton. His presence on the floor will really let us space things out and give Rubio all the passing angles he could wish for, while at the same time making it easier for us to punish double-teams by whipping the ball around to the open man.
Perhaps even more impressive than the upgrades to our starting five are the upgrades to our bench, which actually consists of recognizable NBA players now. Last season, you might have turned on a Suns game and saw Elie Okobo paired with Jamal Crawford in the backcourt, while Josh Jackson and Dragan Bender spotted up on the wings. Those days, thank the lord, are gone. Now our second unit is Ty Jerome running point, Tyler Johnson at the 2, Bridges or Oubre at small forward, and Kaminsky and Baynes as our bigs. (It's rare that first and second units play in clear-cut five-man rotations like that — there's usually a lot of overlap in substitution patterns — but you get the point.) Aside from Jerome, who is an unproven rookie, those are actual competent NBA players who can hang with and even outplay other second units.
On top of all that, we have Monty Williams as our new head coach. Like so many of our other moves, this may not seem like that big of a deal to outsiders. Ho hum, right? Let me tell you: it's a big deal, and not just because the Lakers wanted him, too. Williams is Booker's fifth head coach in five years. Three of the coaches Booker played for were Earl Watson, Jay Triano, and Igor Kokoskov. Not exactly a bunch of Popoviches. Jeff Hornacek (oh my god) was probably the best of the bunch. Booker has played for more head coaches than Dirk Nowitzki (21 seasons), Tim Duncan (19 seasons), John Stockton (19 seasons), Dwyane Wade (16 seasons), Michael Jordan (15 seasons), and Bill Russell (13 seasons). I guess Booker can comfort himself with the fact that Jamal Crawford has played for 19 coaches in 19 seasons — truly a mark of greatness. Williams has impressed so far in interviews, is gelling well with GM James Jones, and has the full respect and command of the team — a far cry from the situation last year, where the assistant coaches were running the show and players couldn't understand what Kokoskov was even saying.
Finally, not only have the Suns drastically improved their roster from last year, they have done so in a way that enables them to continue improving in the future. They have a better GM, a better head coach, and better players. They have Devin Booker locked up through the 2023-24 season. They have avoided long-term albatross contracts, enabling them to maintain flexibility going forward: the only other players besides Booker who have contracts beyond the next three seasons are the rookies we just acquired, who will still be on their rookie deals. Our new state-of-the-art practice facility will be complete in 2021, Booker and Ayton will be entering their primes, and the Suns will have the flexibility to create max cap space and lure a top free agent.
A huge caveat here is that the West is a bloodbath. The Suns could have a dramatically better team this season, which we do, and still not sniff the playoffs. Which of these teams are the Suns going to finish ahead of in the standings?
  1. Nuggets
  2. Clippers
  3. Jazz
  4. Rockets
  5. Lakers
  6. Warriors
  7. Blazers
  8. Spurs
The answer is none of them, barring major injuries. Even if the Suns outplay every other team in the western conference — the Mavs, Kings, Grizzlies, Pelicans, Timberwolves, and Thunder — that would still leave them in 9th place. And some of these other teams might be better too, on top of already having been better than the Suns last year. It's a tough hill to climb.
And yet.
The Suns, at the end of the day, got better. Maybe that only translates to 30 wins this upcoming season, maybe it translates to 35. That's not world-beating, but that's still a big step forward, and if they improve on that record with another 5-10 wins in the 2020-21 season, suddenly the Suns are an actual playoff contender with two established stars, two years of consistency and improvement under their belts, a surprisingly competent front office, a stable coaching staff, an attractive new practice facility in Scottsdale, and cap space to sign another stud.
I mean, at the end of the day, who really knows. Things in the NBA can and often do change overnight. But at least the Suns, for once, have a plan.
submitted by nonanonymo to nbadiscussion [link] [comments]

bathrobeDFS - A List of Links and Sources to Aid in your Research (NBA Edition)

Hey everyone. bathrobeDFS here. People often ask me about the sources that I use, and I want to put together a list for everyone that gives a bunch of free resources that will help you learn, and make your choices from day to day. I hope to keep this updated as new and better links become available/known to me.
NBA Schedule
ESPN’S Schedule - Simple schedule layout. List format which I like. Will also show you if the game is on national TV, which I also like. If you go back, you can check box scores, which is also extremely helpful if you want to dive into some counting numbers.
Player Health/Lineup News - The first thing you should look at. No use playing someone if they are going to be Out. Also helps you understand who would play for people that are going to miss.
Basketball Monster’s Depth Chart Page: It shows you every player, on every roster. Will let you know who is IN, Questionable, Probable, and if someone is out (as well as their expected return date). Not as good as Rotoworld's old site, but will get you by if needed. Most importantly, though, is it accurately (to 95%) shows you who is Questionable/Probable/Out, etc.
RG’s NBA DFS Twitter List - If you want to stay up to date with everything as it breaks, this is a constant stream of NBA Beat Writers that tell you injury news and other lineup news. If you are waiting pre-lock for something to break, this is the first place you are going to see/hear anything.
RG’s Starting Lineup Page - Will give you the projected starting lineup, as well as the Vegas line/spread, for every game. You can also go forward one day to check tomorrow’s potential starting lineups. One of the reasons I love this, in particular, is if you click on a players name, it gives a detailed game log, including what his individual per game USG rate is.
Popcorn Machine - If you want to see who is on the court with who, and check what a person’s normal rotation looks like (For example, Embiid plays 5 minutes to start a game and then sits out for a bit), this is one of the coolest tools you can find. Great information when you mouse over the lines too.
Statistics
Vegas Spreads/Lines - Another one of the first things to check. While this is always only a guide, and no one can predict how everything will go 100% of the time, there is a reason that Vegas and these other books make money
All of the Vegas and Offshore Odds - I will start this off by saying that, if you want to know what the single be-all end-all book to look at, the best single authority, the answer is Pinnacle. If you want to see their odds, you can click on “Offshore Odds” and they are listed there. I like checking them after I check what the average line is (there is a very small difference constantly between the “VI consensus” and Pinnacle).
Offensive Statistics - In order to know who we should play, we should know the numbers that can point to who has the best chance of performing on any given night. Basketball is a high variance sport, but has much less variance than others. Minutes and usage are king in the NBA. We should know who is going to get both of those
Usage Rate: - What I would consider the single most important factor in determining how good a play someone is.
1- ESPN LINK : I like this one the best. It automatically only uses Qualified players. It is sortable by position, as well.,
2- NBA LINK - this will automatically Remove anyone who has played less than 10 games, and will show you usage over the last 15 games. This is a function not available on ESPN. You can change the values if you would like on the top.
Pace: - Another one of the most important factors. Higher pace = more possessions. More possessions = more of a chance to score fantasy points.
Sortable Pace Rankings - This is the site I use to get pace. The link I have provided will show you season long pace numbers. I like to go to the “season segment” drop down menu on the top and look at the last 15 games for a better idea of how teams have been playing recently.
Fantasy Points Per Minute
FPPM for FD and DK - This shows FPPM for FD and DK, by player. It is sortable by their last 5 games, 10 games, or season long. This will only show you the information for players that are playing that current day. You can’t just look up people, as far as I’ve seen (unfortunately).
NBA With Out/With You - Despite the domain name, a free website that will let you check an incredible amount of information with regards to how different people produce with or without teammates on the court. This, by far, gives the most comprehensive information you are going to find with regards to this, anywhere.
Defensive Statistics: - It is important to know that no single Defensive statistic can adequately tell you everything you need to know. You have to try to look at a plethora of information, and try to learn for yourself who is good, and use that to make your own analysis. My favorite websites for defensive stats are:
DvP and FPPG - This is my go to site. It has DK, FD, Yahoo, DRAFT, Fantasydraft and a few other sites I have never even heard of. It also lets you select a range of dates you want (1, 2, 4, or custom select however many games you want to look at). In addition, there are two options that let you look at only the teams playing today, and an option that lets you add last year’s information to this years and average it all together (for teams that have the same rostecoach/playing style).
DRPM - what I would consider the best individual defensive metric (although, again, nothing is perfect). The only problem here is there is no way to filter out players who have only played 1 or 2 games (or who only get a couple minutes per game) so you have to do a little extra work. Still, allows you to sort by position, so you can see how everyone faces up against one another.
DEF WS - A different look at individual Defense by the NBA. This one doesn’t have as much of a tilt towards Centers. Interesting to also take a look at.
TEAM D EFF - A measure of a team’s defensive efficiency. This is a much better metric than others because it accounts for pace. This is sortable for this season, the last 3 games, the last game, home and away, and also lets you look at last season’s D EFF ratings.
Fouls Per Game - One of the other team stats on this site (I would dig into all of them if you can), this is crucial information when deciding if you are going to pay up for a James Harden or not (among others). If he is going against a team that is prone to foul, he is going to have a higher chance of hitting his ceiling. If he is going against a team that doesn’t foul very often, he will have a lot of his potential points taken away.
Opponents’ Total Rebounds per Game - A great way of gauging how much upside your big men might have tonight, here you can see how many rebounds a team typically gives up on the season (as well as over more recent stretches- same as with D EFF).
Free Things from Paid Websites
Awesemo’s Youtube Channel - Multiple free videos every day. Not required to stream it in order to watch it. They do videos about most sports that are played, with great analysis about stats and process. Videos are also for DK, FD and Yahoo. I strongly recommend the (former redditor JoshEngleman) morning video where they go over everything with a fine toothed comb, with numbers and projected ownerships displayed.
RG’s LineupHQ - A free tool for helping you build lineups. There are certain restrictions, but it is free and gets the job done. This also provides free point projections in case you just want to see how they are projecting everyone out.
RG’s CourtIQ - Similar function to NBAWowy. Much faster, but less information.
FantasyCruncher Lineup Rewind - As someone who loves to look back and see what we can learn, this tool allows to see what the absolute best lineup could have been for any sport, any slate. It is a great tool to learn how lineups are constructed, and how a winning lineup could be put together. Additionally, it’s great to see how everyone has been doing recently
New Stuff
From this point on in the article, I want to list new sites either shown to me by other people, or that I stumbled on myself.
StatMuse - If you have any specific questions, StatMuse will help you. "What are the Eastern Conference Standings?" "How tall is Vucevic?" "How have the Bucks done against the Magic this season?" "Who shoots the most 3s for the Pistons?" All these questions and more are quickly answered in an easy to read format. They did a great job here, and I use it for questions like I listed above. This was shown to me by a reader, so I am just learning it myself. I am sure I have barely scratched the surface here.
submitted by bathrobeDFS to dfsports [link] [comments]

Week 48; Experts in authoritarianism advise to keep a list of things subtly changing around you, so you’ll remember.

The humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico worsened with the inadequate response by the federal government. Amid criticism, Trump threatened to pull out, but later backed off. Although the death count officially stands at 45, reporting revealed possibly hundreds more preventable deaths related to the Hurricane Maria.
Trump remains silent on both California’s deadliest wildfires and the deadliest combat incident since he took office. He continues to focus on undoing Obama’s legacy, piece-by-piece. The Mueller investigation hit Trump’s inner-circle, and social media’s role in aiding Russia continues to unfold.
  1. On Saturday night, Richard Spencer led another white supremacist torch-lit rally at University of Virginia. The rally lasted 10 minutes and 40-50 people attended. Spencer vowed, “we will keep coming back.”
  2. On Sunday, Trump attacked former ally Sen. Bob Corker in a series of incendiary tweets, saying “Corker “begged” me to endorse him for re-election” and “wanted to be Secretary of State.” Trump claimed to have said no to both.
  3. Corker responded, tweeting it’s a shame the WH has become an “adult day care center,” and that someone “missed their shift this morning.”
  4. On Sunday, Pence left a Colts game after a protest during the national anthem. Pence later issued a full statement opposing the protests. The Colts were playing the 49ers, a team known to protest.
  5. Before the game, Pence tweeted a photo of him and the Second Lady wearing Colts gear. The photo was one he originally tweeted in 2014.
  6. Shortly after, Trump tweeted he had asked Pence to leave the game “if any players kneeled,” and said he was proud of Pence and the Second Lady.
  7. The pool of journalists covering Pence were not allowed into the stadium, and were told, “there may be an early departure from the game.” ABC estimated Pence’s flight cost taxpayers nearly $250k.
  8. Bowing to pressure from Trump, the Cowboys’ Jerry Jones, after kneeling with players in week 3 of the season, changed course saying any player who “disrespects the flag” by kneeling will not be allowed to play.
  9. On Tuesday, Trump threatened the NFL over protests saying the league is “getting massive tax breaks” and the law should be changed. This claim is false: the NFL gave up its 501(c)(6) tax-exempt status in 2015.
  10. On Tuesday, bowing to pressure from Trump and fans, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who previously had said players had the right to voice their opinions, sided with owners opposed to letting players demonstrate.
  11. On Monday, Pence headlined a fundraiser in CA for Republicans including controversial, Kremlin-ally Rep. Dana Rohrabacher. Rohrabacher had a previously undisclosed meeting in Russia with Veselnitskaya described in Week 47.
  12. University of Wisconsin approved a policy which calls for suspending or expelling students who disrupt campus speeches and presentations. The policy mirrors Republican legislation passed by the state Assembly.
  13. On Columbus Day, unlike Obama, Trump celebrated the “arrival of Europeans,” but did not mention of the suffering of Native Americans.
  14. On Sunday, the Trump’s DHS allowed the Jones Act waiver, which helped speed relief to Puerto Rico, to expire. No explanation was given.
  15. Trump’s EPA announced it would repeal the Clean Power Plan, Obama’s signature policy to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The statement described the regulation as the “so-called Clean Power Plan.”
  16. On Friday, Trump addressed the Value Voters Summit hosted by the Family Research Council, which has been classified by SPLC as an anti-gay hate group. Trump is the first US leader to address the group.
  17. Reuters reported the Trump regime has been quietly cutting support for halfway houses for federal prisoners, severing contracts with as many as 16 facilities, necessitating some inmates stay behind bars longer.
  18. ABC reported the Treasury Dept’s inspector general is looking into allegations reported by BuzzFeed in Week 47 that agency officials have been illegally looking at private financial records of US citizens.
  19. A report compiled by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) at House and Senate Democrats’ request, found the Trump transition team ignored ethics officials and refused to cooperate with the GAO.
  20. Trump named Kathleen Hartnett White to the WH’s Council on Environmental Quality. Hartnett White, a climate science denier, once also said, “fossil fuels dissolved the economic justification for slavery.”
  21. In response to a filing by CREW, Trump’s DOJ told a court in DC that Trump can destroy records without judicial review, including tweets.
  22. Brian Brooks became the second candidate under consideration for deputy Treasury Secretary to withdraw from consideration. Mnuchin said he has no plans to fill the number two slot in his agency.
  23. WAPO reported at the Interior Dept, when Zinke enters the building a staffer takes the elevator to the seventh floor, climbs the stairs to the roof and puts up a special flag. The flag comes down when he leaves.
  24. On Wednesday, NBC reported Tillerson calling Trump a “moron” was provoked by Trump suggesting a tenfold increase in the US nuclear arsenal during a July 20 meeting with the high-ranking national security leaders.
  25. In response to the story which he called “Fake News,” Trump tweeted a threat to revoke the broadcasting licenses of “NBC and the Networks.”
  26. Later that afternoon, at a news conference, Trump again lashed out at the independent news media saying it’s “frankly disgusting the press is able to write whatever it wants to write.”
  27. In a statement Wednesday night, Republican Sen. Ben Sasse asked Trump if he was “recanting” his oath to protect the First Amendment.
  28. Indiana Republican lawmaker Jim Lucas drafted a bill that would require professional journalists to be licensed by state police.
  29. Under pressure to confirm Trump’s judicial nominees, McConnell will no longer allow “blue slips,” used by senators to deny a nominee from their state a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing and vote on confirmation.
  30. The Trump regime withdrew from United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), citing anti-Israel bias and a being in arrears on a $550 million payment. Israel remains part of UNESCO.
  31. NYT published an interview with Corker in which he said Trump is treating his office like a “reality show” with reckless threats at other country that could put our country “on the path to World War III.”
  32. Corker said he is concerned about Trump, and Trump’s behavior should concern “anyone who cares about our nation.” He added there is no ‘good cop, bad cop’ underway with Tillerson — Trump is undermining diplomacy.
  33. Corker said nearly all Senate Republican share his concerns: “the vast majority of our caucus understands what we’re dealing with here.”
  34. WAPO reported Trump is frustrated by his cabinet and that he is not getting enough credit for his handling of three hurricanes. Trump is lashing out and rupturing alliances with both Republicans and Democrats.
  35. One confidant said Trump is like a whistling teapot, saying when he does not blow off steam, he can turn into a pressure cooker and explode: “I think we are in pressure cooker territory.”
  36. Politico quoted 10 sources current and former WH aides who employed strategies like delays and distractions as “guardrails” in trying to manage Trump’s impulsivity.
  37. Vanity Fair reported sources say Trump is “unstable,” “losing a step,” and “unraveling.” They say the WH is in crisis as advisers struggle to contain Trump who is increasingly unfocused and consumed by dark moods.
  38. Trump allegedly told his former bodyguard Schiller, “I hate everyone in the White House!” Kelly is allegedly miserable in the job, and is staying on in a sense of duty and to keep Trump from making disastrous decisions.
  39. One former official speculated Kelly and Mattis have discussed what they would do if Trump ordered a nuclear strike — “would they tackle him?”
  40. According to sources, Bannon said the risk to Trump’s presidency wasn’t impeachment, but the 25th Amendment. Bannon thinks Trump has only a 30% chance of making it the full term.
  41. In a column “What Bob Corker Sees in Trump,” conservative columnist Peggy Noonan urged Republicans they have a duty to speak on the record about what they see happening with Trump.
  42. On Thursday, at a signing ceremony for his health care executive order, Trump nearly walked out of the room without signing the order. Pence pulled him back in.
  43. On Tuesday, Trump said in an interview with Forbes that he could beat Tillerson in an IQ test. Trump met with Tillerson later that day at the WH.
  44. On Friday, Corker called out Trump for his effort to disempower Tillerson saying: “You cannot publicly castrate your own secretary of state without giving yourself that binary choice.”
  45. CNN’s Fareed Zakaria said, “It’s very clear now that we essentially have no diplomacy going on in the United States,” adding the way Trump has treated Tillerson is “the most dramatic example of it.”
  46. On CBS’s 60 Minutes, Parscale claimed he fine-tuned ads on Facebook to directly reach voters with the exact messages they cared most about. He also claimed he handpicked Republican Facebook employees to help.
  47. Daily Beast reported the Kremlin recruited two black video bloggers, Williams and Kalvin Johnson, to produce incendiary YouTube videos calling Hillary a racist. The videos were spread on social media platforms.
  48. WAPO reported Google has uncovered evidence about $100k of ads purchased by Russian agents to spread disinformation on across the company’s many products, including YouTube, during the 2016 election.
  49. Google said the ads do not appear to be from the same Kremlin-linked troll farm that bought ads on Facebook. Some ads touted Trump, Bernie Sanders, and Jill Stein, while others aimed to fan the flames of divisive issues.
  50. Rep. Devin Nunes, who recused himself as Chair of the House Intel Committee’s Russia probe, unilaterally signed off on subpoenas to Fusion GPS, the research firm that produced the Steele dossier. Democrats were not consulted.
  51. Reuters reported Chuck Grassley, the Republican chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, is also taking steps to discredit the dossier according to Democrats on the committee.
  52. Carter Page told the Senate Intel Committee that he will not cooperate with any requests to appear before the panel on Russia, and will plead the Fifth.
  53. Daily Beast reported the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is looking at Cambridge Analytica’s work from the Trump campaign as part of its Russian probe.
  54. Cambridge Analytica, which has ownership ties to the Mercers and Bannon, was brought in to help the campaign by Kushner. The company is also under investigation in the UK watchdog for its role in Brexit.
  55. NYT reported Israel caught Kaspersky Lab working with the Russian government to search the world for US secrets, using Kaspersky software to scan for classified words. Kaspersky software is used by 400 million people.
  56. WSJ reported that Russia’s use of the Kaspersky program to spy on the US is broader and more pervasive than the operation against one individual in Week 47. Trump continues to deny Russian meddling in the US election.
  57. Politico reported as part their posture to cooperate, Trump’s attorneys may offer Mueller a meeting with Trump. If Mueller doesn’t ask by Thanksgiving, attorneys may force the issue by volunteering his time.
  58. Legal experts were surprised by Trump’s lawyers strategy noting Trump would be speaking under oath and he routinely distorts facts, and that Trump would be interviewed in connection with a criminal investigation.
  59. CNN reported Russian operatives used YouTube, Tumblr, and even Pokémon Go as part of their effort to interfere in the election, using a campaign titled “Don’t Shoot Us” to spread a divisive message.
  60. NBC reported Manafort had a previously undisclosed $26 million loan from Deripaska through a series of transactions. It is unclear if the $26 million is a loan or an indirect payment from the Russian oligarch.
  61. The loan brings the total financial relationship between Manafort and Deripaska to $60 million over the past decade, according to financial documents filed in Cyprus and the Cayman Islands.
  62. Manafort’s spokesman, Jason Maloni, initially responded to NBC with a statement including: “Mr. Manafort is not indebted to former clients today, nor was he at the time he began working for the Trump campaign.”
  63. Maloni’s statement was later revised and that sentence was removed. Both Manafort and Maloni have received subpoenas to supply documents and testimony in the Mueller probe.
  64. Yahoo reported Andrew Feinberg, former correspondent for Sputnik, provided a guide and emails to FBI investigators looking into possible violations of the law which requires agents of foreign nations to register with the DOJ.
  65. Further, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is investigating RT and Sputnik as possible parts of the Russian state-run propaganda machine in the broader probe into Russia’s election meddling.
  66. On Friday, Mueller’s team interviewed Trump’s former chief of staff, Priebus. Priebus’ lawyer said he voluntarily met with investigators and “was happy to answer all of their questions.”
  67. Priebus was present during Trump’s efforts to limit the Russia probe, and for discussions that led to the firing of Comey. He was also asked to leave the Oval Office before the infamous Trump-Comey conversation.
  68. Politico reported Twitter deleted tweets and other user data of potentially irreplaceable value to investigators in the Russia probe.
  69. Federal investigators believe Twitter was one of Russia’s most potent weapons. Bots and fake accounts launched recurring waves of pro-Trump, anti-Clinton story lines that were either false or greatly exaggerated.
  70. AP reported Twitter has turned over 201 accounts linked to Russian attempts at influencing the 2016 election to Senate investigators. It is unclear if the posts associated with these accounts have been deleted.
  71. CNN reported an attorney for Roger Stone said he has complied with the House Intel Committee request to provide the identity of his intermediary to WikiLeaks’ Assange.
  72. WSJ reported Congressional investigators are homing in on connections between the Trump campaign, and Facebook, and Twitter. Digital director Parscale was paid $88 million during the campaign, the highest paid vendor.
  73. Every vendor that worked with Parscale on the Trump campaign signed a nondisclosure agreement, and there are no federal disclosure requirements for online ads.
  74. Both Congress and Mueller are investigating the role activity on Facebook and Twitter played in the 2016 election, and whether the Russian social-media activity was in any connected to the Trump campaign.
  75. A Morning Consult poll found Trump’s approval has fallen in every state since he took office. The swings were as high as 30 percentage points in blue-states IL and CA, to 11 points in red-state LA.
  76. A Reuters/Ipsos poll found Trump’s popularity is eroding in small towns and rural communities: in September 47 approve/47 disapprove, down from 55/39 in his first four weeks in office.
  77. WAPO reported as of October 10, Trump’s first 263 days in office, he has made 1,318 false or misleading claims.
  78. The Brookings Institute released a 108-page report which concluded Trump “likely obstructed justice” in his firing of Comey. If Mueller agrees, there are legitimate articles of impeachment that could be drawn up.
  79. In a letter to Mattis, over 100 Democrats are demanding proof that Trump did indeed consult with the Pentagon as he claimed in a tweet, prior to announcing his ban of transgender individuals from military service.
  80. A Kaiser Foundation poll found 62% of Americans say Puerto Ricans aren’t getting the help they need. 76% were aware Puerto Ricans are US citizens.
  81. On Thursday, in a series of tweets, Trump threatened to abandon Puerto Rico’s recovery effort, blaming the island for its infrastructure problems and saying and relief workers would not stay “in P.R. forever.”
  82. The tweets follow harsh criticism from Puerto Rico of the Trump regime’s response to Hurricane Maria. One Puerto Rican said, “He doesn’t think of us as Americans.”
  83. Trump also quoted a Sharyl Attkisson, a television journalist with Sinclair Broadcasting, in saying that while Puerto Rico survived Hurricane Maria, now “a financial crisis looms largely of their own making.”
  84. Later Thursday, the WH issued a statement committing “the full force of the U.S. government” for now, but adding “successful recoveries do not last forever.”
  85. At a House Energy and Commerce hearing about efforts to rebuild the island’s energy grid, Sec. Rick Perry referred to Puerto Rico as a country.
  86. Next day, Trump referred to the Virgin Islands’ governor as a president.
  87. VOX reported although the official death count in Puerto Rico is 45, they found 81 death linked to Hurricane Maria, as well as 450 more reported deaths, most of causes still unknown, and 69 still missing.
  88. Puerto Rico’s governor said four deaths are being investigated as cases of leptospirosis, a disease spread by animals’ urine through contaminated water. A total of ten people have come down with the disease.
  89. Rachel Maddow reported a doctor resigned from the disaster response team in Puerto Rico after seeing medical workers getting manicures and pedicures from residents of the island in medical triage tents.
  90. NYT reported on Puerto Rico’s health care is in dire condition, and continues to suffer from mismanagement. The US Comfort ship with 800 medical personnel which can serve 250, has seen 82 patients in six days.
  91. CNN reported Puerto Ricans are drinking water from a hazardous-waste site, having no other options for water.
  92. A Politico/Morning Consult poll found just 32% of registered voters think the federal government has done enough to help Puerto Rico.
  93. Bloomberg revealed one of its reporters was inadvertently put on the Pentagon’s internal email list which detailed how to spin Hurricane Maria to convince the public that the government response was going well.
  94. On Thursday, Trump also signed an executive order ending Obamacare subsidies for the poor. Not paying the subsidies could boost premiums for millions and send the health insurance exchanges into turmoil.
  95. NPR estimated consumers who earn 400% of the federal poverty level — $48k for individuals or $98.4k for a family of four — will see their the cost of their plans rise by, on average, 20% nationwide.
  96. Doctors, hospitals, insurers, state insurance commissioners and patient advocates denounced Trump’s move. Trump actions puts pressure on Congress to protect consumers from soaring premiums.
  97. WSJ reported if Congress doesn’t succeed, WH aides said Trump “will claim victory” for ending the Iran deal, cutting billions in payments to health insurers, and deporting hundreds of thousands of immigrants.
  98. On Friday, a coalition of attorneys general from 18 states and DC filed a lawsuit to block Trump’s halt to subsidy payments under Obamacare.
  99. NYT reported as of Friday, Trump has taken 12 actions which could weaken Obamacare and curtail enrollment, including spreading negative news releases and posting infographics criticizing the health law.
  100. On Saturday, Trump boasted on Twitter that health insurance companies’ stocks “plunged yesterday” after his steps to dismantle Obamacare.
  101. A Kaiser Health poll found 71% of Americans say the Trump regime should work to improve Obamacare, while just 21% say make it fail.
  102. On Friday, Trump slammed Iran as a “menace” and called for “decertification” of the nuclear deal, Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA), saying Iran is “not living up to the spirit of the deal.”
  103. Trump sent the deal back to Congress with a 60-day window to address its “many serious flaws” or see it “terminated.”
  104. Top officials on Trump’s national security team, including Mattis and Tillerson, said Iran has technically complied with its restrictions. The International Atomic Energy Association also confirmed compliance.
  105. Daily Beast reported while McMaster also wanted to save the Iran Deal, Trump consulted Fox News’ Sean Hannity and former UN Ambassador John Bolton, two neoconservatives who pushed for decertification.
  106. The leaders of Britain, Germany and France declared their commitment to stand by JCPoA. They deal was the culmination of 16 years of diplomacy.
  107. After being added to Trump’s travel ban, Chad pulled its troops from the fight against Boko Haram in Niger. US officials had warned Trump his decision would have major consequences for the fight against terrorism.
  108. California’s deadliest wildfires charred more than 221,754 acres of land in Northern CA, and left at least 35 dead and hundreds more missing. Trump has yet to publicly comment or tweet about the wildfires.
  109. Nor has Trump publicly commented on the deadliest combat incident since he took office, which took place in Niger last Saturday while Trump was golfing. The ambush by ISIS left four soldiers dead and two wounded.
  110. As the week ended, 24 days after Hurricane Maria, just 64% of Puerto Ricans had access to drinking water, and only 14.6% had electricity.
  111. Trump spent his fourth weekend since Hurricane Maria golfing. On Saturday, he visited Trump National Golf Club in VA, his 72nd day of golf since taking office.
submitted by 1000000students to TheConstitution [link] [comments]

[GB] ZZ96 R3, TriC60 b-stock

Both buys are closed. Thank you to everyone who showed interest!
Been getting a lot of PMs recently about this one. Might have to do with the beautiful pics put up by various folks on /mk.
Double feature this time:
ZZ96 R3
Orders are closed for the ZZ96 R3 due to the order count leaping from 0 to 50 eight hours after the creation of this post.
Orders list
Chinese aluminum custom, runs ps2avrGB, utilizes the 96-key layout.
Includes the case (top and bottom), PCB (all components presoldered save for switches, which are not included), sandblasted acrylic midlayer, 2x optional side acrylic diffusers, aluminum plate, and the necessary screws and rubber feet.
$300 shipped worldwide, inclusive of Paypal fees. Down from $315 of the past buy.
Color options heavily reduced. Having 13 colors to choose from for both the case and plate was an undertaking that I'd really not like to repeat. Played a part in the price drop though so there's that.
Some short vids showing the ZZ96: iNVISIBILITi's Mine TK Kim's
RoostrC0gburn's pic Xiro7 Jixr_ nafs_asp LukyNumbrKevin woodworkingbeginner
Order form
Will conclude in about a week. I don't have a set date in mind and will close it sooner if the order count is overwhelming (more than 30), but with the recent slew of buys, I think we're good. Too many orders ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Production will take 2-3 months if nothing goes wrong (something usually goes wrong so 4 months is probably more likely).
TriC60 - Sandwich B-stock
Current count: 18/18
Orders list
TriC60 - Sandwich is a universal aluminum 60% case from the TriC team in China. The case is unique in that it features a pesudo floating-key design, with the top of the case covering the plate, allowing the case and plate to merge seamlessly. The height of the feet is also adjustable to a degree via the two included acrylic pieces for each feet which can be removed to lower the angle of the case.
There are 18 cases that have suffered various indignities while in transit. Examples of which can be seen here.
They are going to be reanodized and sold as-is, available in three colors: black, gray, and silver.
The physical dents and scratches cannot be removed, but should be rendered less noticeable after being reanodized.
The price is $109 shipped worldwide, inclusive of Paypal fees.
Includes the case (top, bottom, and the expansion piece), acrylic midlayer, aluminum feet, bumpons, and screws.
Pics from smashtheplant tusing axtran arallu
Vid from me
Normally I wouldn't expect this to take more than a month to fulfill, but HolyOOPS (who owns the machine shop that TriC uses) and TriC are often prone to delays, from personal experience. Nevertheless, reanodizing should be a quick process.
Order form
It's 4AM and I used the same layout for both forms, except for the color. Lemme know if there's something I missed in my sleep-deprived state.
Cheers folks.
Also if you need to reach me, hit my mailbox @ my username @yahoo.com. I know I missed a lot of PMs and need to catch up but a new msg would make things easier on my end. Thank you.
submitted by LunarisDream to mechmarket [link] [comments]

Get Options data using Google Sheets and Yahoo Finance ... How to Quickly Scan The Best Option Trading Stocks - YouTube IQ option : 80-90% accurate winning strategy using ... Why Binary Option Broker not pay Big Profit? ( Awareness video In URDU and HINDI ) Must watch How to find options data on Yahoo! Finance - YouTube

IQ Option Reviews 233 • Bad . 1.7. iqop tion.com. Visit this website iqop tion.com. ... Thanks Mrs (carolpauline330) at yahoo mail, get in touch with her now and be happy. Useful. Share. Reply. You've already flagged this Victoria Hanks 13 reviews. Never ever fall does this company! The IQ Option Yahoo Answer and is an online broker that is established in the Republic of Cyprus, was founded in 2013, is regulated by the main world regulators. This broker specializes in binary options trading and has international recognition, which is reflected in a growing number of active accounts, which are now more than 11 million ... News, email and search are just the beginning. Discover more every day. Find your yodel. View the basic IQ option chain and compare options of iQIYI, Inc. on Yahoo Finance. IQ Option is an online trading platform that allows traders to bid on various financial instruments such as stocks, foreign exchange (forex), binary options, commodities, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and cryptocurrencies [1]. It is one of the fastest growing online trading brands in the world with over 48,000 registered users and more than one ...

[index] [939] [9445] [7827] [11031] [3841] [9458] [4623] [12329] [3066] [4148]

Get Options data using Google Sheets and Yahoo Finance ...

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. WHY YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND PRICE ACTION WHEN TRADING **FOREX-STOCKS-CRYPTOCURRENCY** What Broker Do I recommend? https://bit.ly/2QCWYTD Disclaimer Our conten... How to find options data on Yahoo! Finance. http://researchata.com Get My Option Trading Watchlist Here: https://goo.gl/s95PFr

https://balyconcduct.cf